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Numinous: Spiritual Holy Devine Mystical Supernatural

Profile Information

Gender
Male
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Elizabeth
State
New Jersey
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single
What's your zodiac sign?
Aquarius
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Self employed
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50 and over
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Unite State
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Native American

Lets Not Let It Continue To the Next Generations...

understand the mind of a Black Artist they must be 10 times greater than Whites they know that they going to be look at by all. The National Anthem is our song we are the Native Americans this country is our country by the way of generational, when we sing we put our heart and soul into what we believe in and we believe in American, Pattie Labelle, Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston, and my opinion Marvin Gaye was and still is the best and the greatest National Anthem singer of all time. Which bring me to a beautiful sister who (they) said she lip sing Beonce, the problem is that they can’t sing their own National Anthem we the Black American or Native American sing from our soul and mean what we sing and that my Brothers and Sisters is True, check out Marvin Gaye.

THE BEAUTY OF BLACKNESS – Black is a very powerful color; the founders of the world religions were Blacks, as well as many of the earliest gods and goddesses: Krishna of India, Jesus Christ, Tyr of Scandinavia, etc. The wonderful properties of melanin.
And for my Beautiful Sister it was it is and always be about the Black Woman the Beautiful Black Bold Woman. These videos above will show true knowledge of what was and still is and always will be Woman the Black Woman the Mother of earth and haven and all that surround it check the videos out.

 

 


How smooth must be the language of the whites, when they can make right look like wrong, and wrong look like right.

Black Hawk.



 

 

 

 

 

Madagascar the Knowledge of the unknown, but known now.

 

The Queen of Madagascar isn’t a cartoon of animals nor the people of Madagascar, yes indeed do they cover the true up with lies and deception showing a illusion a cartoon for children instead showing the history of a country which a Black Queen had rule a Black Woman over a Great Kingdom, and you see that Madagascar plays a part in Our history which is Our Story also. John L. Waller and Queen Ranavalona III they both sit down and came up with a Treaty with the United State, but the French capture the Black American John L. Waller the news came back home and Black Americans protected about the capture. Here the rest of the true.

In 1888, Waller became the first African-American Presidential elector, supporting the Republican ticket. He was given the responsibility to transport the results of the Kansas vote to Washington, D.C. that year.

Following an unsuccessful campaign to become Kansas state auditor, Waller was appointed as U.S. Consul to Madagascar in 1891. When his service there had concluded, the island's monarchy bestowed upon him a concession consisting of 150,000 acres (610 km2) on the southern end of the island lush with mahogany, ebony, rosewood and rubber trees. He developed the land into a thriving industry.

 

 

After France entered into a treaty with the Malagasy government, the French Resident objected to the granting of the concession without their permission. Waller was arrested and accused by the French of being a spy providing military information to the Hovas. Apparently, they perceived Waller's success in developing his concession as infringing on their efforts to colonize the island. As a result Waller was court-martialed and sentenced to twenty years in prison. Congressional resolutions led to U.S. President Grover Cleveland demanding Waller is set free. He was released after ten months' incarceration in Marseille. The concession he held was considered invalid by the French and confiscated by them. And that became the Waller Affaire which we call now Diplomatic immunity.

 

Queen Ranavalona III (November 22, 1861 – May 23, 1917) was the last sovereign of the Kingdom of Madagascar. She ruled from July 30, 1883 to February 28, 1897 in a reign marked by ongoing and ultimately futile efforts to resist the colonial designs of the government of France.

Click the image to open in full size.

 

But they don’t tell you that there were Black people here in American before the Europeans came out Darkness and came to America. In the Bible its call The tower of Babel people were scatter over the face of the earth which in science its call continental Drift and Shift there were  people on the continent all ready and drifting away across the earth, the Europeans thought that the earth was flat.

Something to think about a question: Who was on the ships that Columbus came over on the Piñata the Nina and the Santa Maria it wasn’t the European whites, but the European (Blacks) Moors and the (Black) Jews of Spain, who Queen Isabella of Spain deportation all who didn’t accept Christian faith got kick-out Spain, but the ones who didn’t accepted they were kick out of Spain and ship to America 1492.

Queen Elizabeth the first  had done the same deportation of the Moors out of England 1682, and also Thomas Jefferson adopted the same concept of deportation of young Black males because of slave revolt in America, and after they starting potting against the Moorish Empire by the way of a book call Le Code Noir which means the Black Code, and now 420 years later they are still using the same codes on us 420 years of Blacks Law, and also today they call it Black’s Law Dictionary. They make Laws against Black people, we must stop being so naïve the Law is History and History is the Law, once you know His-story you will know the Law, and the Law was made for us and against only us.

Code Noir

The Code noir (French pronunciation: [kɔd nwaw], Black Code) was a decree originally passed by France's King Louis XIV in 1685. The Code Noir defined the conditions of slavery in the French colonial empire, restricted the activities of free Negroes, forbade the exercise of any religion other than Roman Catholicism (it included a provision that all slaves must be baptized and instructed in the Roman Catholic religion), and ordered all Jews out of France's colonies. The Code Noir also gave plantation owners extreme disciplinary power over their slaves, including legitimizing corporal punishment as a method of maintaining control. The code has been described by Tyler Stovall as "one of the most extensive official documents on race, slavery, and freedom ever drawn up in Europe."  

http://www.blackpast.org/?q=primary/louisianas-code-noir-1724

http://www.frenchcreoles.com/Louisiana%20Black%20Codes/louisiana%20black%20codes.htm

 

Origins

According to his 1787 analysis of the Code Noir, Louis Sela-Molins claimed that its two primary objectives were to assert French sovereignty in her colonies and to secure the future of the cane sugar plantation economy. Central to these goals was control of the slave trade. The Code aimed to provide a legal framework for slavery, to establish protocol governing the conditions of colonial inhabitants, and to end illegal slave trade. Religious morals also governed the crafting of the Code Noir - this was in part a result of the influence of the influx of Catholic leaders arriving in Martinique between 1673 and 1685.

The Code Noir was one of the many laws inspired by Jean-Baptiste Colbert, who began to prepare the first (1685) version. After Colberts 1683 death, his son, the Marquis de Seignelay, completed the document. It was ratified by Louis XIV and adopted by the Saint-Domingue sovereign council in 1687 after it was rejected by the parliament. The second version of the code was passed by Louis XV at age 13 in 1724. It then was applied in the West Indies in 1687, Guyana in 1704, Reunion in 1723, and Louisiana in 1724. Code Noir existed in Canadian New France, and received legal foundation from the King from 1689-1709.

 

At this time in the Caribbean, Jews were mostly active in the Dutch colonies, so their presence was seen as an unwelcome Dutch influence in French colonial life. Furthermore, the majority of the population in French colonies was slaves. Plantation owners largely governed their land and holdings in absentia, with subordinate workers dictating the day to day running of the plantations. Because of their enormous population, in addition to the harsh conditions facing slaves (for example, Saint Domingue has been described as one of the most brutally efficient colonies of the era), small scale slave revolts were common. Despite some well-intentioned provisions, the Code Noir was never effectively or strictly enforced, in particular with regard to protection to slaves and limitations on corporal punishment.

 

These videos show that history do repeat itself as the shooting of many young Black males all around the United States repeat itself, Scottsboro Boys, 1931 Emmett Till 1955 and now 2012 still shooting of Black males, Shawn Bell of New York, the term death and prison is very real and true The student, Danroy Henry, 20, of Easton, Mass also and now a 17 year old Trayvon Martin. The argument in the this first video with James Famer and Malcolm X the both had very good points on the issue but James Famer made a excellent point on bombing, 1921 Black Wall Street it had happen bombing of a Black community of Greenwood, a successful, all-black enclave in Tulsa, was the site of the deadliest race riot in U.S. history.

For the inhabitants of "the Black Wall Street," life would never be the same. In 1985, the group made national news when police dropped a bomb on the Osage house from a helicopter in an attempt to end an armed standoff.

The explosion ignited a fire in which 11 people died, including five children and the group's leader, John Africa. Only two occupants survived Ramona, an adult and Birdie, a child. In addition, 60 homes were destroyed. History do and will always repeat itself for the ones who don’t know.

History That Has Been Forgotten

Native Americans of North America, indigenous peoples of North America. Native Americans had lived throughout the continent for thousands of years before Europeans began exploring the “New World” in the 15th century.

Scientists believe these people first migrated to the Americas more than 10,000 years ago, before the end of the last ice age (see First Americans). However, some Native Americans believe their ancestors originated in the Americas, citing gaps in the archaeological record and oral accounts of their origins that have been passed down through generations.

For this reason let us start putting together a portrait of history, where a race of people who was once lived in power over a period of time was blotted out of History.

A quote from Chancellor Williams who wrote The Destruction of Black Civilization says: Black giants of history who have been classified and effectively disguised as Caucasians over the centuries. First of all one must know the various names that referred exclusively to Blacks and by which they were known throughout the ancient world. We depend too much on white scholars to do our work for us, why because they write from the Caucasian viewpoint and we are naïve, indeed, if we expect them to do otherwise.

The reason why our history is lost is because: Millions of early Blacks who were forced either by circumstance or expediency to replace their own names with Asian and European names only added to the problems of historical identification.

Let’s take a look at part of the Treaty of the Six Nations and when it was written: This Treaty was written in 1789: Articles of a treaty made at Fort Harmar, the ninth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-nine, between Arthur St. Clair, esquire, Governor of the territory of the United States of America, northwest of the river Ohio, and Commissioner plenipotentiary of the said United States, for removing all causes of controversy, regulating trade, arid settling boundaries, between the Indian nations in the northerly department and the said United States, of the one part, and the sachems and warriors of the Six Nations, of the other part:

You ask why I chose this Treaty; It is to show you that Arthur St Clair (1787) is President St. Clair an addition to Laurel's run down of Sinclair/St Clair history. Yes there was a US President. This information came from Dan Valentine's book of little known facts entitled Spirit of America essay no. 9. Because there was an 8 year gap between the founding of our nation and the ratification of the constitution (1781-1789) there were 8 people who held the position of elected president before George Washington. Each of those years the president of the US Continental Congress was the prime authority of the nation. They were elected for one year. Under the Article of Confederation: Why is it stated that there are 7 missing Presidents is because they were considered to be Black, some say they were negro, they were Mulattos, of a mixed race descendents of the Moor Indians. It was St Clair and the six others who ran the country before Washington was elected President under the Constitution of the United States. History lost because of the change of a name so that we would not know Our History.

 

 

 

It has always been about [The Black Woman] and always will be. So its about a Black Woman Eve, so by saying that the BIBLE is about us...

Absalom Jones

Absalom Jones (November 6, 1746–February 13, 1818), the first African American priest ordained in the Episcopal Church, is commonly associated with the event that led to the formation of the African Methodist Episcopal denomination. Jones and Richard Allen (1760–1831) led a group of black worshippers out of Saint George's Methodist Church on a Sunday in November 1787 in protest of the church's decision to segregate black worshippers in the upstairs gallery.

Jones was born a slave in Sussex, Delaware. He taught himself to read during his early teens and learned to write after being taken to Philadelphia to work in his master's store as a clerk and handyman. In 1766 he began attending Anthony Benezet's school in the evenings. In 1770 Jones married another slave, whose freedom he purchased with the assistance of Quaker friends and his father-in-law. Jones later purchased his own freedom in 1784, after which he continued to work for his former master.

Jones was active at Saint George's Episcopal Church in Philadelphia and served as a lay preacher. His outreach efforts to Philadelphia's African American population gained greater success after Allen, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1786, joined the church. They formed the Free African Society on April 12, 1787, to provide aid and support to the sick, widows, and orphans. Philadelphia had the largest free African American population in the country, and the Free African Society was one of their major public gathering places. The number of black worshippers at Saint George's increased with the success of Jones and Allen's ministry and preaching. The white church leaders consequently restricted black worshippers to the balcony. On a Sunday in November 1787 Jones seated himself in a front pew in the balcony, but an usher insisted that he had to move to the rear of the balcony. When Jones refused, the ushers attempted to physically move Jones from his seat, whereupon Jones, accompanied by Allen and the other black worshipers, left the church.

After they left Saint George's, Jones and Allen formed the African Church and held regular worship services. By 1792 the group had begun to raise funds for a church building, but the members disagreed over the appropriate denominational affiliation. Most of the members voted for affiliation with the Episcopal Church. Jones went with the majority, and Allen went with the minority that favored Methodism.

On July 17, 1794, the former group completed the construction of its new church building, which was consecrated Saint Thomas's African Episcopal Church, with Jones as its first minister in the official ecclesiastical capacity of licensed lay reader. The church was formally received into the Diocese of Pennsylvania on October 17, 1794. Jones was ordained as a deacon on August 6, 1795, and as a priest in 1804.

Jones was renowned as an orator and for the pastoral care he provided his members through house-to-house visitation. The church grew to a membership of 427 people, and under Jones the leadership organized schools, the Female Benevolent Society, and the African Friendly Society.

Although Jones and Allen followed separate denominational paths, together they founded Philadelphia's African Masonic Lodge in 1798, petitioned Congress and the state legislature for an end to slavery in 1800, and founded the Society for the Suppression of Vice and Immorality in 1808. In 1812 the Vigilance Committee approached Jones, Allen, and James Forten regarding efforts to defend the city, for which these men recruited 2,500 black men. In January 1817, Jones and Allen organized a convention to coordinate opposition to the American Colonization Society, which encouraged blacks to emigrate to Liberia.

 

 

 
                                       Elizabeth Freeman (Mum Bett)
                                                   1742 – 1829

 

Elizabeth Freeman was probably born in 1742, to enslaved African parents in Claverack, New York. At the age of six months she was purchased, along with her sister, by John Ashley of Sheffield, Massachusetts, whom she served until she was nearly forty. By then she was known as "Mum Bett," and had a young daughter known as "Little Bett." Her husband had been killed while fighting in the Revolutionary War.

One day, the mistress angrily tried to hit Mum Bett's sister with a heated kitchen shovel. Mum Bett intervened and received the blow instead. Furious, she left the house and refused to return. When Colonel Ashley appealed to the law for her return, she called on Theodore Sedgewick, a lawyer from Stockbridge who had anti-slavery sentiments, and asked for his help to sue for her freedom.

Mum Bett had listened carefully while the wealthy men she served talked about the Bill of Rights and the new state constitution, and she decided that if all people were born free and equal, then the laws must apply to her, too. Sedgewick agreed to take the case, which was joined by another of Ashley's slaves, a man called Brom.

Brom & Bett v. Ashley was argued before a county court. The jury ruled in favor of Bett and Brom, making them the first enslaved African Americans to be freed under the Massachusetts constitution of 1780, and ordered Ashley to pay them thirty shillings and costs. This municipal case set a precedent that was affirmed by the state courts in the Quock Walker case and ultimately led to the abolition of slavery in Massachusetts.

After the ruling, despite pleas from Colonel Ashley that she return and work for him for wages, Mum Bett went to work for the Sedgewicks. She stayed with them as their housekeeper for years, eventually setting up house with her daughter. She became a much sought-after nurse and midwife.

Elizabeth Freeman died in 1829, a free woman, surrounded by her children and grandchildren in the free state of Massachusetts that she had helped to create. One of her great-grandchildren was W.E.B. DuBois, born almost forty years later in Great Barrington, the very town where her historic case was argued.

The tombstone of Elizabeth Freeman (Mum Bett), the African American woman whose suit for freedom helped bring about the end of slavery in Massachusetts, can still be seen in the old burial ground of Stockbridge. It reads: "She was born a slave and remained a slave for nearly thirty years. She could neither read nor write yet in her own sphere she had no superior or equal. She neither wasted time nor property. She never violated a trust nor failed to perform a duty. In every situation of domestic trial, she was the most efficient helper, and the tenderest friend. Good mother, farewell."

 
 

 

Welcome to North Carolina’s largest metropolitan area. Once called Charlotte town, the city was named Charlotte in 1762 in honor of the British Black Queen “Charlotte Sophia” while the county was named Mecklenburg to denote the region in Germany where she was born.

England 1768 ended slavery Black  Brittish American  who stood against the Americans Whites, because slavery had ended in England 1768, Queen “Charlotte Sophia granted Governorship to 7 Black men to govern the  7 Southern States. 

Prince Hall and others had meet with the King and Queen the white folks had took them out of history its a 13 years gap from 1776 to 1789 Jonh Hanson was the Brittish American President from 1781 to 1782 and you go to looking for him they will show you three diffrent pictures of a white man claiming that this is Jonh Hanson a wise man will investigate what a fool took for granted seek and you will find many Black people in Brittish history who contributions their life for freedom but white American refuse the King and Queen order and it was a war against the Brittish Congress and the American Congress.

Yes indeed it was two Congress fighting the Brittish Congress fought to keep they freedom while the American Congress was saying keep slavery Elizabeth Freeman and Sophie Charlotte, also the names of the brothers below all was part of America history.

The Articles of Confederation only allowed a President to serve a one year term during any three year period, so Hanson actually accomplished quite a bit in such little time. Six other presidents were elected after him - Elias Boudinot (1783), Thomas Mifflin (1784), Richard Henry Lee (1785), Nathan Gorman (1786), Arthur St. Clair (1787), and Cyrus Griffin (1788) - all prior to Washington taking office. So what happened? Why don't we ever hear about the first seve
Its not about the depth of knowledge, but seeking and reading and understanding why and how  "WE" was left out and to correct it.

Black Queen Charlotte and her Contributions to Britain

Princess Sophie Charlotte was born on May 19, 1744--the eighth child of the Prince of Mirow, Germany, Charles Louis Frederick, and his wife, Elisabeth Albertina of Saxe-Hildburghausen. In 1752, when she was eight years old, Sophie Charlotte's father died.

A princess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Sophie Charlotte was descended directly from an African branch of the Portuguese Royal House, Margarita de Castro y Sousa. Six different lines can be traced from Princess Sophie Charlotte back to Margarita de Castro y Sousa. This explains her African appearance in her Royal portraits that exist today.

Sophie Charlotte married George III of England on 8 September 1761, at the Chapel Royal in St James’s Palace, London, at the age of 17 years of age becoming the Queen of England and Ireland. Their were conditions in the contract for marriage, ‘The young princess…, join the Anglican church and be married according to Anglican rites, and never ever involve herself in politics’. Although the Queen had an interest in what was happening in the world, especially the war in America, she is seen to have fulfilled her marital agreement.

An indicator of George’s feelings towards his wife may be seen by the fact that, as stated on the Royal website, ‘George III bought Buckingham House in 1761 for his wife Queen Charlotte to use as a comfortable family home close to St James's Palace, …14 of George III's 15 children were born there’.

Having married the King, she became consort to the George III, and they were both devoted to each other. The Royal couple had fifteen children, thirteen of whom survived to adulthood. There fourth eldest son was Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent (2/11/1767- 23/01/1820), who later fathered Queen Victoria.

Her Majesty Queen Charlotte made many contributions to Britain as it is today, though the evidence is not obvious or well publicised. Her African blood line in the British royal family is not common knowledge. Portraits of the Queen had been reduced to fiction of the Black Magi, until two art historians suggested that the definite African features of the paintings derived from actual subjects, not the minds of painters.

In Queen Charlottes era slavery was prevalent and the anti-slavery campaign building up. This may go some way to explaining why Britons are not fully aware of the racial mix of the royal family. Portrait painters of the royal family were expected to play down or soften Queen Charlottes African features.

http://www.rastafarian.net/black_queen_of_england.htm

 

 

The video of Rabbit Proof Fence is a very good example of how they were breeding out the Black Moorish Indians as they was with the Aboriginal peoples of Australia" this video show beyond the shadow of doubt the true plan of American as the plan was in Australia to breed out the true Black Native’s of  all the known world Hawaii and Australia is the best example and American check out this video Rabbit Proof Fence pt/2 and listen to what he is saying  (Moor River Native Settlement ) Moor meaning Black.

 

 


The substance and meaning of Sufism
The substance of Sufism is the Truth and the meaning of Sufism is the selfless experiencing and actualization of the Truth.

The practice of Sufism.
The practice of Sufism is the intention to go towards the Truth, by means of love and devotion. This is called the spiritual path or way towards God.

The Definition of the Sufi, sufi is one who is a lover of Truth and Knowledge, who by means of love and devotion moves towards the Truth, towards the perfection which all are truly seeking. As necessitated by love's jealousy, the sufi is taken away from all except the Truth.


                                                  My Nationality

Definitions of native Characteristic of or existing by virtue of geographic origin;

  • "The Native North American an indigenous person who was born in a particular place; belonging to one by birth; "my native land"; "one's native language"
  • A  person born in a particular place or country; "he is a native of Brazil"
  • Characteristic of or relating to people inhabiting a region from the beginning; "Native Americans"; "the aboriginal peoples of Australia"
  •  Native - the quality of belonging to or being connected with a certain place or region by virtue of birth or origin.

 

 

How smooth must be the language of the whites, when they can make right look like wrong, and wrong look like right.

Black Hawk

 

 

 

 

We have men among us, like the whites, who pretend to know the right path, but will not consent to show it without pay! I have no faith in their paths, but believe that every man must make his own path!

Black Hawk - Sauk

 

                      

 

The Origin of the Word 'Black'
 
Black’ can be traced back to its proto Indo-European origins through ‘bhleg’ which means ‘to burn with black smoke’ or ‘to burn black with smoke’. ‘Bhleg’ was incorporated into Old High German as ‘blah’ (black), Low Franconian as ‘black’ (ink) and Old Norse as ‘blakkr’ (dark, dusky).

Black in Old and Middle English

The Old English ‘blæc’ was relative to its ‘blegh’ origin as it was  predominantly used as an adjective to describe ‘colour pertaining to matter that  was colourless from the absence or complete absorption of light’. This adjective  can be seen in Old English literature such as K. Ælfred’s ‘Bæda’ from c890, ‘hæfde blæc feax’ (have black hair). By Middle English it was common to use  black as an adjective, ‘My mistress eyes are raven black ’(1600), as a verb, ‘The paper will be blacked by the smoke’ (1532), and as a noun, ‘stand before me  like my Blacks’ (1619) (hired mourners in funerals).

Black's Semantic Shifts

It was not till the sixteenth century that the semantic broadening of black  occured- both figurative connotations as well as literal. From ‘blacken’ and its  literal meaning ‘to stain black’ came the figurative meaning ‘to stain someones  reputation, or defame’. This additional meaning however was purely negative and  as its influence broadened, the semantic shift of black began to mean having  malignant or deadly purposes and even pertaining to or involving death- ‘black  curse’(1583), ‘the Queen's black enemy’(1758), and from previous centuries ‘The  Black Death’

Read more at Suite101: The Origin of the Word 'Black': How Black Entered the English Language | Suite101.com http://edurne-scott.suite101.com/the-origin-of-the-word-black-a50079#ixzz1gAyY3RBQ

 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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"To Negro Writers" (1935)--by Langston Hughes

 

 

 

There are certain practical things American Negro writers can do through their work.

We can reveal to the Negro masses, from which we come, our potential power to transform the now ugly face of the Southland into a region of peace and plenty.

We can reveal to the white masses those Negro qualities which go beyond the mere ability to laugh and sing and dance and make music, and which are a part of the useful heritage that we place at…

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Posted on June 6, 2011 at 9:48pm — 2 Comments

The Breaking Process of the African Woman

The Breaking Process of the African Woman

Take the female and run a…

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Posted on June 7, 2010 at 1:37pm — 6 Comments

Saggin Pants

Saggin Pants…
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Posted on May 19, 2010 at 10:30am — 10 Comments

Moors Vs. Arabs


When the Romans entered West Africa in 46 B.C., they saw Africans and called them Maures, from the Greek adjective Mauros, meaning dark or black. It is from Mauros and the Latin term Marues that the word Moor is derived. Since the inhabitants of North Africa were black, the Romans and later the Europeans called them Moors. It is no coincidence that the land inhabited by the Moors…

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Posted on May 14, 2010 at 12:18pm — 5 Comments

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At 11:09am on September 29, 2014, Desmond Collins said…

Hello!

At 10:05pm on September 2, 2014, senta said…

Hello,

Thank you for the add...
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Peace

Senta~

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At 10:46pm on November 15, 2013, Sheba7 said…

PLEASE SEE:  Mother of Abusive Morehouse Man Needs Your Help Dealing With His Narcisstic Tendencies!  THANKS

At 10:39pm on November 15, 2013, Sheba7 said…

Hi There:

Thanks for your friend request.  If you would, please take a look at my post and give me your black male perspective regarding an issue that I am currently facing.

Warmest Regards,
Sheba7

At 5:32am on October 18, 2013, Kenneth Melton said…

Thanks for the connection Abdbin. Let's chat and connect 704-244-1186

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contact me at ( hannan.abdallah@yahoo.in )
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Miss Hannan

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At 10:12pm on July 18, 2013, lewis aju said…

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Miss aichasy

At 7:08am on May 30, 2013, kirsty said…

hello,nice tomeet you,im enjoying a day off in the heart of the Scottish countryside,how are you?

At 9:09am on March 14, 2013, Archie House said…

Thank you for the invit

At 11:46am on March 12, 2013, charles p. harris said…

hello abdbin pleased to meet you Park Avenue BandP1000306.JPG

At 8:18am on February 28, 2013, Corky Johnson said…

Good Morning: Love your art work, your page is very creative, keep up the teachings, our people need to know their history. We are one, our cause are one, and to together, we must help each other, if we are going to succeed. Corky J.

At 7:18pm on February 19, 2013, Janet Bond said…

Hello how are you doing!

 
 
 


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